Sharp objects by Gillian Flynn

 

This is the third book I’ve read by the author Gillian Flynn and the first of the three separate books she’s written. For being the first book it’s more brutal and dark than her other books but you couldn’t really put your finger on why. I would describe it as a Thriller in a Dollhouse. The allegory isn’t far of the truth either.

 

You could say that the core of the story takes place in Camille’s hometown, or to be more specific, in her old childhood home.  Camille, being a journalist, is reluctantly sent back to her hometown to unravel the case of the two young girls murdered there. She is not only forced back to the old neighbourhood but also to her own past, meanwhile living with her mother.

 

But the world outside her mothers house is like a foggy mixture of the real housewives of New Jersey and True Detective. The civic life of the Chicago pulse which Camille leaves behind is merely a whisper in the back of our minds. That’s all left behind her and she is far, far away from anything that comes near civil behaviour. Throughout the book Chicago, and foremost the conversations with her boss Mr Curry, is the laps in time and space in witch Camille is given a chance to breath. But it’s much like giving a drowning man a straw to breath through. It helps, but not nearly enough.

 

Corporal focus

Its not even important what the characters are saying nor what they are not saying.  The bodies are explicitly speaking for them in a number of ways. For Camille this is essential. Her body is etching, stretching, screaming. Its constantly telling/ tempting her like a painful struggle for forbidden pleasure.

 

A few things a love about the book:

 

The language. It’s raw and awake. It doesn’t hide anything, nor is it ashamed of anything. With simple means you are smitten with a strong feeling of illness. And you commit to different characters only through a few describing words. And as always, the title is beautifully placed.

 

The adulthood that is distilled down to Camille, a cocktail of the sense of being an adult and at the same time a child. The bounders in between are merged together. To have cravings and impulses and needs like a child is one thing, but to have them as an adult its shamefully painful.

 

Do you think you can figure out how it’s all linked? – Brace yourself for the exciting solution that isn’t primarily about who committed the murders of the girls.

 

As with all of Flynn’s works, the resolution of the crime is not of utmost importance, but rather the process of unravelling the story. The way the story shapes and changes, and keeps you guessing at all times, is what really makes this story a fantastic experience. It makes for a very pleasurable, albeit sometimes almost stressful, read.

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